mikerugnetta

mikerugnetta:

Back around Thanksgiving (the day before Thanksgiving, actually) I gave an hour long talk at the Cybera Summit 2013 in Banff, Canada. It’s about why it’s important to take funny media on the internet seriously, with a special focus on goats and goat videos… of course.

You want to watch it, you can. Because here it is. Thanks in so small part to Meagan Hampel who HAND EDITED my keynote presentation into the video footage IN iMOVIE. JEEZ. Thanks, Meagan.

A quick update on the MemeFactory book:

- We’re working through the legal questions of image use.

- We’re checking all our citations and making them consistently formatted.

- We’re double checking chapters written separately to make sure we don’t contradict or repeat ourselves.

- We’re assembling outside contributors’ contributions.

A quick update on the MemeFactory book:

- We’re working through the legal questions of image use.

- We’re checking all our citations and making them consistently formatted.

- We’re double checking chapters written separately to make sure we don’t contradict or repeat ourselves.

- We’re assembling outside contributors’ contributions.

Computers linked other technologies to human beings by constituting systems-constituting them conceptually, practically, and metaphorically-as information processors. They created a closed world of semiotic values in which future wars could be imagined, their soldiers trained, and their outcomes deduced. Yet the world of computer simulations was more than a game. For unlike the chess-style war games of previous eras, computer-age commanders could engage in simulations using equipment that not only resembled, but sometimes actually was, the equipment used for real war. The closed world within the machine, and the closed world of real strategy it supported, blurred together in an intricately woven, discursively constituted whole.
Paul N. Edwards. The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America